Social Security Disability FAQ

Talk to a Tampa SSDI Attorney

Are you considering pursuing SSD or SSDI benefits? You may have questions about the process and eligibility of your health complication. If that is the case, you can have peace of mind knowing that our Tampa SSDI lawyers are here to answer some of your most common questions. If you want more information or would like a specific answer, feel free to contact our legal team.

What types of disabilities qualify?
While there is a "blue book" containing information on what types of disabilities are frequently considered eligible, just about any condition that prevents full time work may make you eligible for benefits. Some of the more common types of disabilities that qualify include mental disorders, cardiovascular conditions, musculoskeletal problems, and immune system disorders.

What are the SSD/SSDI requirements?
In order for a disability to qualify for benefits, it must be clear and obvious that the medical issue prevents and individual from working at their current job. Not only that, but it should be proven that the condition also prevents you from working at any other type of occupation as well. If it is anticipated that the injury/disability will prevent you from working for more than 12 months, you will likely be eligible for benefits.

Does it matter where I worked prior to my injury/disability?
Yes, your employment history is very important. Why? If your disability does not meet the official SSA impairment listing, the SSA will carefully examine any past jobs you have had to determine if you have any useable skills. This means that even if you are unable to do your current work, you may be denied benefits based on the fact that you could do previous work.

Are there differences between SSD and SSDI?
Yes. Social Security Disability is available to any workers who have accumulated the required amount of work credits. In contrast, Supplemental Security Income is available to low-income individuals who have either never been employed or do not have enough work credits. They are two different government programs with distinct differences. SSI is strictly need-based according to income and assets, while SSDI is funded through payroll taxes.

How can I qualify for SSI/SSDI benefits?
Once you make a claim, it will be sent to a state agency to determine whether or not you qualify. The Disability Determination Services (DDS) will review your situation to calculate how much work you are doing and whether or not you are mentally or physically unable to perform your work or any past work you have done. The examiner will review your medical records, past employment, and current condition. They will ask if you are currently working, how severe your condition is, if you condition meets a disability listing, and if you are able to work full-time. Once they have reviewed these questions, they will determine whether or not to give you benefits.

How long should I wait to file for disability benefits?
As soon as you notice your injuries or disability and feel like you are no longer able to work, you should take steps to file a claim right away. It can take SSD and SSDI cases a serious amount of time to process your claim, especially if you are denied the first time. This means that you could spend months without the supplement income or benefits you need to provide for yourself and your loved ones. The sooner you act, the more likely your case will be resolved in a timely manner.